Welcome to SDEE

Welcome to San Diego Entrepreneurs Exchange! 

The San Diego Entrepreneurs Exchange (SDEE) is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization run by local entrepreneurs for entrepreneurs and pre-entrepreneurs interested in Life Sciences, Biotech, Pharma, Medical Devices, Tech and Alternative Energy. SDEE was founded to provide a voice and resources for early stage startups, to encourage new entrepreneurs, and sponsor networking and educational services to help develop skills necessary to bring new businesses and funding to the San Diego area. 

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SDEE Silver Sponsors

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  • Thursday, September 15, 2016 at 05:00 PM · 6 rsvps
    New English Brewing Company in San Diego, CA

    Monthly Happy Hour

    Come network with your fellow San Diego entrepreneurs at Happy Hour hosted by New English Brewing Company.

    Everyone is welcome (and yes, registration is free!), SDEE members get 10% drinks discount.

    Thursday, September 22, 2016 at 05:30 PM · $30.00 USD · 1 rsvp
    Hera Hub in San Diego, CA

    WORKSHOP: Welcome to Consulting: How to be the best and hire the best consultants

    If you are thinking of starting or your own consulting business, improving your existing one, or looking for tips on how to hire great consultants, please join us for this highly informative and interactive workshop.

    We will cover topics such as:

    • How do I decide if consulting is for me? What are the benefits and risks?
    • How should I structure my business and who should advise me?
    • What should I charge for my services?
    • How do I market my business?
    • Do I need a website or just social media?
    • What are clients looking for in a great consultant?
    • What should I look for in hiring a consultant?

    Speakers

    Sylvia Norman, PhD, PMP, Founder & CEO, Molecular Diagnostics Consulting, Inc.

    Amy Rasdal, Founder, Billable at the Beach®

    John Wallen III, Ph.D., J.D., Colt Advisors, LLC


  • News From SDEE Members

    New physical location: CureMatch Inc now incubated at JLABS San Diego

    New Online location: new website at http://www.curematch.com    
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    Crinetics Pharmaceuticals Appoints Ajay Madan as VP, Development

    Crinetics Pharmaceuticals announced the addition of Ajay Madan, PhD, DABT, as the Vice President of Development. Dr. Madan has a distinguished career in drug development as former VP of Preclinical Development at Neurocrine Biosciences and CSO at XenoTech. “It’s exciting to join the company at such a crucial time as we prepare to move our first program into the clinic,” said Dr. Madan. Crinetics Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is a San Diego company that discovers and develops novel therapeutics targeting peptide hormone receptors for the treatment of endocrine-related diseases and cancers.  
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  • Meet SDEE Community

    The Perfect Pitch - Tips From the Pros

    June 23, 2016 Workshop: Perfect Pitch – For Creating and Delivering Winning Presentations by Neil Thompson, Patent Agent & Writer Does the idea of pitching an investor make you want to…abandon that idea? If so, you’re not alone. The pitch workshop, hosted by SDEE on June 23 at Hera Hub, was packed with people wanting to know how to perfect their pitch. Here are 10 tips from the experts. Specials thanks to our panelists Jeff Friedman (Tech Coast Angels), Larry Fromm (Achates Power), Diane West (2Connect), and Grace Chui-Miller (Correlation Ventures) for their nuggets of wisdom.  Get the audience’s attention within the first minute (Larry says you have one minute to grab investors’ attention before they tune out. Facebook photos won’t scroll through themselves after all. Larry also says that if you have an hour for the pitch, do it in 20 minutes, leaving the rest of the time for Q&A.) Tell the audience a story (Diane understands that investors need data to make an informed decision about your company, but she implores people who are pitching to couch that data in stories. Kids like stories. Adults do, too.) Know your audience (According to Diane, the story that the pitch audience wants to hear will vary. The technology-minded will want to hear a technology story. The business-minded? A business story. Find out beforehand who will be in the audience to tailor the story to the audience.) Be honest about challenges (One of Jeff’s pet peeves is presenters that say they have no problems. There are always issues to overcome. Be honest about them. The investors, if they choose to take you on, may be able to help.) Focus on your strengths, not your competitors’ weaknesses (Larry is immediately turned off by pitch presenters who disparage the competition. Chances are the pitch audience knows your competitors and all their warts. Focus on the benefits of your product and how it addresses the problem you’re solving.) Don’t claim that you have no competitors (When she hears a pitch presenter say there is no competition, Grace thinks either the pitch presenter didn’t do his homework or is lying to make his product seem more novel. Acknowledge the competition. It makes you seem more knowledgeable of the market.) Don’t include financial models with dramatic increases (If you’re a pitch presenter, do you have a slide in your deck that resembles a hockey stick, rising uniformly over a 10 year period then leveling off? Ditch that slide. Grace believes that 2-3 year financial projections are the best a pitch presenter can reasonably estimate. 10 years? 15 years? No way.) Always have backup slides with more detailed information on hand (In Jeff’s group at Tech Coast Angels, the pitch audience is often mixed. For example, a scientist may have technology-related questions, so have slides available that would address them. Don’t present those slides unless asked, especially if the majority of the audience is not science or technology savvy.) Be confident, not arrogant (Diane’s view is that there’s a fine line between confidence and arrogance. The line consists of listening. Confidence is quiet. Arrogance is loud. Listen to learn the audience’s needs. Accept feedback.) Don’t try to get married on the first date (Larry is adamant that the purpose of a pitch is to start a conversation, not end it. Investors don’t typically write a check at the end of a pitch. The pitch is to get the pitch presenter to the next phase of the investors’ selection process. Hopefully, closing the deal will come soon enough!). Neil Thompson is a writer, patent agent, and notary public among other things. You can read his musings on his blog “I’m not an expert. I’m just a guy who likes to think about stuff…” at neilithompson.com.
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    Advice For Entrepreneurs From San Diego Startup Week

    by Amy Duncan, Goldfish Consulting, Inc. San Diego Startup week is an innovative weeklong conference that seeks to build an ecosystem of entrepreneurship in San Diego, provide resources for entrepreneurs, and amass a network of like-minded individuals to discuss common issues and share experiences. This year’s conference included a Bio/MedTech track with 15 events. I attended five of the Bio/MedTech sessions, held at the Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine in La Jolla. Three of the sessions reverberated themes that included teams, partnerships, and licensing that I’ll cover in this blog. Speakers and Panelists Participants in “Starting a Biotech Company - JUST DO IT!!” included founders/CEOs Julio de Unamuno from LabFellows, Thomas Hitchcock from Xycrobe Therapeutics, Inc., Paul Laikind from ViaCyte, Zachary Zimmerman from Forge Therapeutics, Inc., Curt Becker from Molecular Assemblies, and Tim Mullen from Qusp Labs. Participants in “Licensing IP from UCSD and other Research Institutions” included Scott Forrest from BlackThorn Therapeutics, Paul Roben from UCSD, and Zachary Zimmerman. Participants in “Biotech Partnerships and Joint Ventures” included Greg Mckee from CONNECT, Jay Lichter from Avalon Ventures, Damien McDevitt from GSK, and Elizabeth Schwarzbach from Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute. Participants in “What Biotech Investors Look For When Funding Startups” included Julio de Unamuno, Kara Bartone from JLABS, Stephen Connelly from BioMed Ventures, and Ron Shigeta from Indie.bio. Building your Team When de Unamuno asked whether the panelists preferred having loyal or independent team members, the founders unanimously agreed that loyalty and trust are fundamental. The panelists advised working your network to get recommendations for first hires, and that while having a rock star team member was clearly beneficial, they are difficult to lure. Founding team members are either senior level and in a financially secure position to take a pay cut and try something new, or desperately in need of a job. Once you build the lab and foundational data, you can leverage these assets to attract higher quality employees and prune those that don’t fit. The panelists underscored the value of people first, referencing the adage, “It’s about the jockey, not the horse.” Bartone said one reason startups fail is when founders try to start a company part time, in off hours, or with no full-time employees. She said it’s hard to move a company forward this way. It was echoed throughout the track that few professors make it as a CEO straight out of the lab, and are typically unsuccessful at trying to be CEO and do the science at the same time. Panelists advise professors starting companies to find a business partner and maybe a post doc to run the science. Shigeta says his accelerator, Indie.bio, won’t invest in sole founders, citing that an entrepreneur needs to be able to talk at least one other person into joining them. Being Coachable and the Ability to Pivot In the early days of your startup, Shigeta says it’s common that no one knows anything about you, you have no track record, and you are your only asset. Investors look for “coachable” bright people who can take advice and step away from the science and be product focused. Shigeta encourages entrepreneurs to share their vulnerabilities and be open. Connelly underscored the importance for entrepreneurs to understand their technology as a product, where it fits, how it addresses an unmet need, and how it will move the needle. Bartone added that cheaper, me too, or slightly better won’t cut it. Shigeta said the product has to be spectacular. That being said, the final product probably won’t end up how it was initially envisioned. Being able to recognize when things aren’t going right and being able to pivot is critically important. All the panelists agreed that companies typically end up pivoting and pursuing different directions, further supporting the notion that you need a good, solid team to persevere. Partnering with VCs and Biotechs Typical VC firms are small with about four or five people. Getting time with a decision maker is hard to do. Lichter advises finding someone in the VC’s network and convince them to make the introduction. When you see a VC at a networking event, even if you’ve met before, Shigeta says the VC likely won’t remember who you are. Always be clear on who you are and be ready to deliver your quick pitch again. The best way to establish a biotech partnership, according to McDevitt, is to talk to the people in business development at the company. Forrest and Bartone both raised the notion that you need to do your research on what areas and types of companies VCs and biotechs are interested in partnering with and investing in. For biotechs, they advised that you do your homework to understand their therapeutic focus areas and make sure your technology applies. Reinforce how your technology plays in their picture; indicate if it’s a new direction for them, a supplement or add on to an existing area, or how it grows one of their current franchises. Position your company on the role it will play for them, and how it will contribute to their growth, so they can pitch it internally. For VCs, know how much they are looking to fund. Know how much funding you need, based on the size of your team and phase of development. Connelly says missing a good deal is what keeps VCs up at night. They don’t have a lot of time, so prepare a one-pager that describes your mission, the problem you are addressing, your proposed solution, how it’s different, how you plan to create value, the market size and non-obvious opportunities, and brief bios on the management team. Potential partners can look at the data later if they are interested. If there is interest, you’ll likely get invited to a follow on meeting covered by a non-disclosure agreement (NDA), but don’t feel pressured to reveal proprietary data. Even the VCs don’t want to open themselves up to liability. If the investment community says “no” Connelly advises to be sure to understand why. Understand how each VC operates and what the motivations are. From a venture fund perspective, it’s all in the timing on how much money they raised and where they are in deploying the funding. If they just raised $100 million, they may want to fund an earlier/risky stage. If they’ve already deployed it and have some left over, they may not want to come in early and stay in the game long term. They may not have the money or buy in from their partners at that time. You may have to come back when the timing and funding is better, or when you have more data. But don’t stalk. Licensing IP When it comes to universities and research institutions out-licensing technology Forrest and Roben said their strategy was to ensure their technology can succeed. Institutions wanting to safeguard their technology is the focus of the licensors’ program, not a small part that can be shelved or thrown away. They want to license to the partner “who’s going to love their baby the most.” The universities and research institutions are looking to partner with a team that has a plan, commitment and passion, and can execute. Forrest says it takes about 30 seconds to determine if the person is serious, experienced, and has a plan to take the IP forward. Zimmerman noted that startups interested in licensing a technology typically want to test it out and see if it has legs, but can’t pay a lot of money for it, and investors aren’t interested in giving 5% to the university. To address this conundrum, he drafted up a letter of intent to obtain exclusive access to the university’s technology for 12 months. Zimmerman used the letter of intent as a tool to raise the seed round, which ultimately was used to pay the license fee, without giving away part of the company. Finally, identifying the IP you want to license is not an exercise in simply reviewing a catalog of what’s available. Forrest said entrepreneurs need to either already know the professor behind the patent or be familiar with the area and understand its impact. Words of Wisdom Lichter said to plan for things not to go right, and that 95% of things we start will fail in this industry. Shigeta says that while you most likely will lose all of the investment, lose it responsibly and not painfully. Hitchcock said there will be anxiety starting a company, there’s no other way around it. The best way to diffuse stress, Mullen advised, is through talking about issues with the team. Laikind suggested that if an entrepreneur needs a support group, maybe that entrepreneur is not up for the task. Fortunately, there are conferences like San Diego Startup Week, organizations (SDEE, CONNECT and Biocom) and incubators/accelerators (JLABs, Indie.bio and Lichter’s COI Pharmaceuticals) to help entrepreneurs network, meet advisors, and establish a network of support to tap into along the way.  
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SDEE is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization founded by local San Diego entrepreneurs
in order to provide a voice for the early stage start-up, to support new entrepreneurs and their companies,
and to sponsor networking and educational events
to help develop the skills necessary to bring funding, business, and jobs to the San Diego area.

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